Self Love: Body Image Stigmas & How Schools Can Help

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By: Meelan Mohsin

As I learned more about who I am, I also started to notice how fucked up society is. How are we supposed to learn to love and accept ourselves but on social media there is the “ideal body type” roaming around the Explore Page on Instagram. Big eyes, small nose, big Kylie lips and the tiniest waist has known demand. The idealistic body type is not only just for women; It’s for men as well. For men, they’re supposed to have toned bodies with tanned skin, a million dollar smile, good hair, and money — lots of it. These messages are harmful to us teenagers because it makes me feel like I don’t belong.

It’s funny how celebrities on social media support self-love, but they post pictures of pills and waist trainers. An example is Kim Kardashian is someone who loves to show off her body and claims to do it to teach young women to love themselves. How are we supposed to learn to love ourselves if society demands us to look a certain way to be accepted? We all have flaws, and we all have insecurities, but that’s what makes us unique. We are not robots we are human beings with feelings too. Social media culture tries to program us. We have minds of our own, and we don’t need the Instagram beauty standard to know our self-worth.

We are worth more than 1,000 likes and comments. One thing that makes everyone beautiful is confidence. Confidence is the key to beauty. WE ARE BEAUTIFUL IN OUR OWN WAYS.

We are not robots we are human beings with feelings too. Social media culture tries to program us. We have minds of our own, and we don’t need the Instagram beauty standard to know our self-worth.

Schools are often breeding grounds for body image issues, so here are a few steps schools can take to help young girls (and boys) feel better about just being themselves:

1. Integrating positive body image conversations into already existing lessons
2. Having poster campaigns around campus that openly discuss how to build and maintain healthy habits mentally, physically and emotionally.
3. Actively integrate self-love practices in Restorative Justice sessions that involve students, teachers, community members, and faculty.

This blog was first published on http://www.energyconvertors.org